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Special Report on Global Warming of 1.5 °C (SR15)
Special Report on Global Warming of 1.5 °C (SR15)
14-10-2018 - A la une
  Following the decision of the panel at its 43rd Session to accept the invitation from the UNFCCC, at its 44th Session, the Panel approved the outline of Global Warming of 1.5 °C, an IPCC special report on the impacts of global warming of 1.5 °C above pre-industrial levels and related global greenhouse gas emission pathways, in the context of strengthening the global response to the threat of climate change, sustainable development, and efforts to More »

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Choosing the future of Antarctica
Choosing the future of Antarctica
23-08-2018 - News scientifiques
Choosing the future of Antarctica S.R. rintoul, S. L. chown, r. M. Deconto, M. H. england, H. A. Fricker, V. Masson-Delmotte, T.R. Naish, M. J. siegert & J. C. Xavier https://doi.org/10.1038/s41586-018-0173-4 Nature, Published: 13 June 2018 credit: Alain Mazaud, LSCE "We present two narratives on the future of Antarctica and the Southern Ocean, from the perspective of an observer looking back from 2070. In the first scenario, greenhouse gas More »
Carbon-14 provides direct evidence of synthetic chemicals in ancient cosmetics
Carbon-14 provides direct evidence of synthetic chemicals in ancient cosmetics
23-08-2018 - News scientifiques
Absolute dating of lead carbonates in ancient cosmetics by radiocarbon, Communications Chemistry, Lucile Beck, Ingrid Caffy, Emmanuelle Delqué-Količ, Christophe Moreau, Jean-Pascal Dumoulin, Marion Perron, Hélène Guichard, Violaine Jeammet – DOI : 10.1038/s42004-018-0034-y Thanks to the measurement of carbon-14 in lead carbonates for the first time ever, French researchers have been able to distinguish between chemicals of natural origin and chemicals More »
Lessons about a future warmer world using data from the past
Lessons about a future warmer world using data from the past
23-08-2018 - News scientifiques
Selected intervals in the past that were as warm or warmer than today can help us understand what the Earth may be like under future global warming. A latest assessment of past warm periods, published in Nature Geoscience by an international team of 59 scientists from 17 nations, shows that in response to the warming ecosystems and climate zones will spatially shift and on millennial time scales ice sheets will substantially shrink.   Credit photo: Alain Mazaud, More »

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